TOP 50 DEALER WINNER 2007, '08, '09, '10, '11, '12, '13, '14, '15...   RV PRICES INCLUDE $1000 DEALER FINANCE BONUS DISCOUNT

                           

RV TERMS S - T

Safety Chains or Cables | The chains on your hitch or tongue used to keep the trailer or towed vehicle connected to the tow vehicle in the event the hitch fails. You want proper rated chains to ensure the towed vehicle can not break totally free. We don't want a 10,000 pound trailer wandering around the interstate unsupervised at 65 mph!

Screen room | Term for screen enclosure that attaches to the exterior of a RV for a "bug free" outside sitting area. Some screen rooms attach to an RV awning for rain protection as well.

Self-contained | An RV that needs no external connections to provide short-term cooking, bathing, and heating functions and could park overnight anywhere.

Series Connection | This is where multiple batteries are connected positive to negative for the purpose of doubling voltage. ie. (2) two trojan T-105, 6 volt deep cycle batteries, connected to produced 12 volts for the house systems.

Series-Parallel Connection | This is generally where you have 4 to 6, (6) volt batteries. They are paired in series to produce 12 volts, and then the pairs are connected in Parallel to increase available amperage.

Shank | Also called a hitch bar or stinger, the shank is a removable portion of the hitch system that carries the ball or adjustable ball mount, and slides into the receiver.

Shore Cord | The external electrical cord that connects the vehicle to a campground electrical hookup.

Shore Power | Electricity provided to the RV by an external source other than the RV battery.

Sideout | A unit that slides open when the RV is parked to expand the living area.

Slide-in | Term for a type of camper that mounts on a truck bed, because often this type of camper "slides-in" to the truck bed.

Slide-out | Additional living space that "slides-out" either by hydraulics, electricity or manually, when the RV is setup for camping. Frequently referred to simply as a "slide".

Slider | Slang for slider-hitch.

Slider-hitch | Referring to a sliding hitch used on short bed trucks for enabling them to tow fifth wheels, allowing them sufficient clearance to jack-knife the trailer. In this situation the trailer is too close to the cab. When making very tight turns you can get a conflict where the rear corner of the cab and the leading corner of the fifth wheel attempt to occupy the same space. The resulting collision is generally sure to make for a lousy day. The slide hitch, some automatic, some manual, slide temporarily to the rear, increasing the distance from trailer to cab and allowing tighter turns without "conflict". They must be returned to towing position before resuming high speed hauling and can only be used at relatively slow speeds.

Snowbird | Term for someone in a northern climate that heads "south" in winter months.

Soft-sides | Telescoping side panels on an RV that can be raised or lowered, usually constructed of canvas or vinyl and mesh netting.

Spring Bar | Component parts of a weight-distributing hitch system, the spring bars are installed and tensioned in such a manner as to distribute a portion of the trailer's hitch weight to the front axle of the tow vehicle and to the axles of the trailer.

Stabilizer Jacks | These are typically lighter, manually operated, jacks only used to stabilize a trailer or motorhome that has been leveled with blocks under the wheels. They are used to stop the rig from bouncing in the wind or broadcasting to the neighbors that you are having a "Cialus" moment!

Starting Battery or Chassis Battery | Battery used for starting the engine of your RV (Motorhome or Tow Vehicle). Designed for minimal depth of discharge. Overdischarging can seriously damage a starting battery and significantly shorten its service life.

Stinger | See shank.

Stinky Slinky  |  Term for RV sewer hose.

Storage | The RV goes into storage during time when it is not in use.

Streetside | The part of the vehicle on the street side when parked.

Sway | Fishtailing action of the trailer caused by external forces that set the trailer's mass into a lateral (side-to-side) motion. The trailer's wheels serve as the axis or pivot point. Also known as "yaw."

Sway Control | Devices designed to damp the swaying action of a trailer, either through a friction system or a "cam action" system that slows and absorbs the pivotal articulating action between tow vehicle and trailer.

Tag Axle | On motorhomes or buses with two rear axles, this is the one, to the rear, that is not connected to a drive shaft. It only serves to carry weight and provides no drive or impulsion.

Tail Swing | Motorhomes built on chassis with short wheelbases and long overhangs behind the rear axle are susceptible to tail swing when turning sharply. As the motorhome moves in reverse or turns a corner, the extreme rear of the coach can move horizontally and strike objects nearby (typically road signs and walls). Drivers need to be aware of the amount of tail swing in order to prevent accidents.

Tail Swing | Motorhomes built on chassis with short wheelbases and long overhangs behind the rear axle are susceptible to tail swing when turning sharply. As the motorhome moves in reverse or turns a corner, the extreme rear of the coach can move horizontally and strike objects nearby (typically road signs and walls). Drivers need to be aware of the amount of tail swing in order to prevent accidents.

Tailgunner | The end RV or vehicle in a caravan. He or she makes sure nobody gets left behind due to breakdown or other unintended consequences. They are usually pretty highly experienced in RVs and are capable and equipped to make minor repairs on the road, to get you back underway.

Telescoping | Compacting from front to back and/or top to bottom to make the living unit smaller for towing and storage.

TH | Abbreviation for "toy hauler". 

Thermocouple | A thermocouple is a device that monitors the pilot flame of a pilot model propane appliance. If the pilot flame is extinguished the thermocouple causes the gas valve to shut off the flow of gas to both the pilot flame and the main burner.

Three-way Refrigerators | Appliances that can operate on a 12-volt battery, propane, or 110-volt electrical power.

Tip-out | Term for a room (generally in older RVs) that "tipped-out" for additional living space once RV was parked. Newer RVs mainly use "slide-out" rooms.

Toad | Term for your towed vehicle behind your motorhome or sometimes behind a fifth wheel.

Toe or Wheel Alignment | Toe is the measure of whether the front of the wheels (looking down from the top) are closer (toe-in) or farther (toe-out) than the back of the wheels.

Tongue Weight | The amount of weight imposed on the hitch when the trailer is coupled. See "hitch weight."

Tow Bar | A device used for connecting a dinghy vehicle to the motorhome when it's towed with all four wheels on the ground.

Tow Car | A car towed by an RV to be used as transportation when the RV is parked in a campground.

Toy Hauler or Toy House | Term for fifth wheel, travel trailer or motorhome with built-in interior cargo "garage" space for motorcycles, bikes, hobby gear, work / trade show, etc. Typically accessed by a ramp on the rear of the RV.

Tow Hitch | The hitch system used to attach, generally to a motorhome or bus, to tow your "Toad".

Towing Double | A term used to describe the action of towing two trailers or vehicles in tandem. ie. a fifth wheel and boat or atv trailer.

Tow Rating | The manufacturer's rating of the maximum weight limit that can safely be towed by a particular vehicle. Tow ratings are related to overall trailer weight, not trailer size, in most cases. However, some tow ratings impose limits as to frontal area of the trailer and overall length. The vehicle manufacturer according to several criteria, including engine size, transmission, axle ratio, brakes, chassis, cooling systems and other special equipment, determines tow ratings.

Tracker | The tracker is a device secured on recreational vehicles so that the vehicles can be tracked by satellite. A safety measure, this device helps recover stolen RVs.

Trailer Brakes | Brakes that are built into the trailer axle systems and are activated either by electric impulse or by a surge mechanism. The overwhelming majority of RVs utilize electric trailer brakes that are actuated when the tow vehicle's brakes are operated, or when a brake controller is manually activated. Surge brakes utilize a mechanism that is positioned at the coupler, that detects when the tow vehicle is slowing or stopping, and activates the trailer brakes via a hydraulic system (typically used on boats).

Transmission Cooler | A heat exchanger similar to a small radiator through which automatic transmission fluid passes and is cooled by airflow.

Travel Trailer | Also referred to as "bumper pull" or "conventional trailers," these types of rigs have an A-frame and coupler and are attached to a ball mount on the tow vehicle. Travel trailers are available with one, two or three axles. Depending upon tow ratings, conventional trailers can be towed by trucks, cars or sport-utility vehicles.

Triple Towing | Term for three vehicles attached together. Usually a tow vehicle pulling a fifth wheel and the fifth wheel pulling a boat.

Truck Camper | The type of camper that slides into the bed of a truck.

Truck Camper Jacks | The jacks used on slide in truck campers to unload the camper from the truck bed.

TT | Abbreviation for "travel trailer". 

TV | Abbreviation for tow vehicle or television.

RV TERMS ELECTRICAL

Converter | An electrical device for changing or converting 120-volt AC power into 12-volt DC power. Most RVs with electrical hookups will have a converter, since many of the lights and some other accessories run on 12-vold DC. Changing or converting to an inverter frequently yields better battery life due to the more proper charging capabilities of the improved chargers built into most inverters. Consider adding a surge protector between your unit and shore RV electric hook-ups to avoid power surges to your RV electrical system.

Generator | An electrical device powered by gasoline or diesel fuel, and sometimes propane, for generating 120-volt AC power in the absence of shore or solar power. Some RVers are even carrying wind generators that they set up for longer term, boondocking camps!

Gen-Set or Genset | A generator for powering 110 volt appliances in the absence of an inverter or for charging depleted batteries.

Inverter | A unit that changes 12-volt direct current to 110-volt alternating current to allow operation of computers, TV sets, and the like when an RV is not hooked up to shore electricity.

RV Umbilical | That heavy cord on your RV that you attach to "Shore Power" or the campground electrical pedestal to supply electrical power to your RV. Word to wise use a surge protector to protect your RV electrical system.

Shore Cord | The external electrical cord that connects the vehicle to a campground electrical hookup.

Shore Power | Electricity provided to the RV by an external source other than the RV battery.

RV TERMS BATTERIES

Auxiliary Battery | Extra battery to run 12-volt equipment.

Battery Bank | A collection of deep cycle batteries used to power your RV "House" systems. Generally 2 to 6 batteries connected in series and/or parallel.

Chassis Battery | Another name for the engine starting battery

Deep Cycle Battery | Batteries that are constructed to allow deeply discharging them with minimal degradation of their capacity. Unlike "starting" batteries that are fairly quickly damaged by deep discharges. However, minimizing the depth of discharge of "Deep Cycle" batteries will lengthen their service life.

Golf Cart Battery | Common slang for a variety of deep cycle batteries. Generally a lead / acid type of battery. You do not have to Play Golf or own a Golf cart to use these batteries!

House Battery | Battery or batteries in motorhome for operating the 12-volt system within the motorhome, separate from the chassis. Usually a bank of 2 to 6 batteries.

Parallel Connection | This is where multiple batteries are connected positive to positive and negative to negative to increase available amperage.

Series Connection | This is where multiple batteries are connected positive to negative for the purpose of doubling voltage. ie. (2) two trojan T-105, 6 volt deep cycle batteries, connected to produced 12 volts for the house systems.

Series-Parallel Connection | This is generally where you have 4 to 6, (6) volt batteries. They are paired in series to produce 12 volts, and then the pairs are connected in Parallel to increase available amperage.

Starting or Chassis Battery | Battery used for starting the engine of your RV (Motorhome or Tow Vehicle). Designed for minimal depth of discharge. Overdischarging can seriously damage a starting battery and significantly shorten its service life.

RV TERMS W - Z

Wagonmaster | A leader, either hired or chosen, who guides a caravan of recreational vehicles on a trip. The wagonmaster usually makes advance reservations for campgrounds, shows, cruises, sightseeing and group meals.

Wally World | Slang term used by RVers to describe a Wal-Mart. Call ahead as they often let you "dry camp" in their parking lot overnight for free.

Weekender's | People who own their RV's for weekend and vacation use.

Weight-Carrying Hitch | Also known as a "dead-weight" hitch, this category includes any system that accepts the entire hitch weight of the trailer. In the strictest sense, even a weight-distributing hitch can act as a load-carrying hitch if the spring bars are not installed and placed under tension.

Weight-Distributing Hitch | Also known as an "equalizing" hitch, this category includes hitch systems that utilize spring bars that can be placed under tension to distribute a portion of the trailer's hitch weight to the tow vehicle's front axle and the trailer's axles.

Weights
GAWR | Gross Axle Weight Rating. The maximum allowable weight each axle is designed to carry, as measured at the tires, therefore including the weight of the axle assembly itself. GAWR is established by considering the ratio of each of its components (tires, wheels, springs, and axle) and rating the axle on its weakest link. The GAWR assumes that the load is equal on each side.
GCWR | Gross Combined Weight Rating. The maximum allowable combined weight of the tow vehicle and the attached towed vehicle. GCWR assumes both vehicles have functioning brakes, with exceptions in some cases for very light towed vehicles, normally less than 1,500 pounds. (check your chassis manual or towing guide).
GVWR | Gross Vehicle Weight Rating. The maximum allowable weight of the fully loaded vehicle, including liquids, passengers, cargo, and tongue weight of any towed vehicle.
NCC | Net Carrying Capacity. The maximum weight of all personal belongings, occupants, food, fresh water, LP gas, tools, dealer installed accessories, etc., that can be carried by the RV. (Technically, the GVWR less the UVW equals the NCC.)
Payload Capacity | The maximum allowed weight that can be in or on a vehicle, including all cargo and accessories, fuel freshwater, propane, passengers and hitch loads.
UVW | Unloaded Vehicle Weight. The weight of a vehicle as built at the factory with full fuel, engine (generator) oil and coolants. It does not include cargo, fresh water, LP gas, occupants, or dealer installed accessories.
Water (weight) | 8.3 lbs. per gallon
LP gas (weight) | 4.5 lbs. per gallon
Driver (estimated weight) | 200 lbs.
Passenger (estimated weight) | 120 lbs.
Gasoline | Weighs 6.3 pounds per gallon
Diesel Fuel | Weighs 6.6 pounds per gallon
Propane | Weighs 4.25 pounds per gallon

Wet Weight | Term used by RVers to describe the weight of a RV with all storage and holding tanks full. i.e., water, propane, etc.

Wheelbase | Distance between center lines of the primary axles of a vehicle. If a motorhome includes a tag axle, the distance is measured from the front axle to the center point between the drive and tag axles.

Widebody or Wide Body | Designs that stretch RVs from the traditional 96-inch width to 100 or 102 inches.

Winnie | Nickname for Winnebago, a well-known RV manufacturer.

Winterize | To prepare the RV for winter use or storage. Usually, the term refers to preparation specifically related to the water tank, walls and windows of the RV. 

Wohnmobil | The term used by Germans, Wohnmobil refers to a motorhome.

Work Camping or Workamping: Many RVers need to make a few dollars to supplement their income. Some only need to work for a site to defray their expenses. Workamping refers to the various ways that RVers can achieve that goal. From camp hosting, Vendors at shows, wagon masters & tail gunners, retail clerks at some of the parks or campgrounds, the list of possibilities is nearly endless. Restrained only by your talent and creativity.

X Roads | A term used on signage, "X roads" means crossroads or an intersection.

Yaw | Fishtailing action of the trailer caused by external forces that set the trailer's mass into a lateral (side-to-side) motion. The trailer's wheels serve as the axis or pivot point. Also known as "sway."

Zig Unit | For lighting as well as for water pumps and other leisure battery uses, the zig unit provides 12-Volt electric power in the motorhome when connected.

RV TERMS 0 - 9

120 AC/12 DC/LP-gas | The power sources on which RV refrigerators operate; 120 AC is 120-volt alternating current (same as in houses); 12 DC is 12-volt direct current (same as in motor vehicles); LP-gas. Some RV refrigerators can operate on two of the three sources, others on all three.

RV TERMS U - V

Umbilical Cord | The wiring harness that connects the tow vehicle to the trailer, supplying electricity to the trailer's clearance and brake lights, electric brakes and a 12-volt DC power line to charge the trailer's batteries. An umbilical cord can also be the power cable that is used to connect to campground 120-volt AC electrical hookups.

Underbelly | The RV's underfloor surface, which is protected by a weatherproofed material.

Unlaiden Weight | The unlaiden weight is how much the RV weighs before loading.

Unsprung Weight | Weight of those parts of the rig not supported by suspension (ie. tires, wheels, axles, hubs)

UTQGL (Uniform Tire Quality Grade Labeling) | A program that is directed by the government to provide consumers with information about three characteristics of the tire: tread wear, traction and temperature. Following government prescribed test procedures, tire manufacturers perform their own evaluations for these characteristics. Each manufacturer then labels the tire, according to grade.

UVW (Unloaded Vehicle Weight) | Weight of the vehicle without manufacturer's or dealer-installed options and before adding fuel, water or supplies.

Vacation | The term "vacation" refers to a holiday. The word "vacation" is commonly used in the United States.

RV TERMS Q - R

Quad | Can mean all terrain vehicles with four wheels, but in RVing terms as in quad bunks or quad slide-outs it means the number four.

Quick Disconnect | Electrical / water / propane connections that only require a quick tug (without tools) to disconnect.

Receiver | The open portion of a hitch that permits a hitch bar or shank to be inserted. The receiver may be either 11/2, 15/8 or 2-inch square; the smallest being termed a mini-hitch.

Recreational Vehicle Types | Bus Conversion, Diesel Puller, Diesel Pusher, Fifth 5th Wheel Trailer, Travel Trailer, Folding Tent Trailer, Pop-up Trailer, Motorhome Class "A", Class "B" and Class "C", Toy Hauler/Toy Hauler Trailer/Toy House Trailer and Truck Camper.

Reefer | (Not the now legal in some States kind) RVer slang for "refrigerator". Refrigerators are often found in either a "two way" or "three way" operating mode. Two way: has a gas mode and an AC mode. Three way: has a gas mode, AC mode, and 12v DC mode. The coolant used in RV refrigeration is ammonia. The two most common manufacturers of RV refrigerators are Norcold and Dometic.

Rig | What many RVers call their recreational vehicle units.

Road Wander | Term used to describe inability to maintain the motorhome in a straight, forward travel without constant back and forth motion of the steering wheel.

Roof Air Conditioning | Roof mounted air conditioning (A/C) unit. Can be ducted.

RV | Short for Recreation Vehicle, a generic term for all recreational vehicles which contain living accommodations. Multiple units are RVs and persons using them are RVers.

RVDA | Abbreviation for Recreational Vehicle Dealer's Association.

RVIA | Abbreviation for Recreational Vehicle Industry Association.

RV Umbilical | That heavy cord on your RV that you attach to "Shore Power" or the campground electrical pedestal to supply electrical power to your RV. Word to wise use a surge protector to protect your RV electrical system.

RV TERMS O - P

OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturer | OEM refers to the company that originally manufactured the product. When referring to RV parts, OEM designates a replacement part made by the manufacturer of the original part.

Overcab Bed | The overcab bed is built-in over the cab of the vehicle.

Parallel Connection | This is where multiple batteries are connected positive to positive and negative to negative to increase available amperage.

Park Model | Type of RV that is usually designed for permanent parking but is shorter in length than a traditional mobile home. All the amenities of a mobile home but not built for recreational travel.

Part-timers | People who use their RV for longer than normal vacation time but less than a one year period.

Patio Mat | Carpet or woven mat for use on ground outside of RV. Used whether or not a concrete patio pad is available where camping.

Payload Capacity | The maximum allowable weight that can be placed in or on a vehicle, including cargo, passengers, fluids and fifth-wheel or conventional hitch loads.

Pilot | A pilot is a small standby flame that is used to light the main burner of a propane fired appliance when the thermostat calls for heat. Pilots can be used in furnaces, water heaters, refrigerators, ovens and stove tops. Also the driver of a motorhome is referred to as a pilot.

Pitch-in | Term for a RV campground "get-together", usually means "pitching-in" a covered dish or casserole.

Pop-out | Term for room or area that 'pops-out' for additional living space in RV. This type of expanded living area was more common before the technology of slide-out rooms became popular and available.

Popup or Pop-Up | Folding camping trailer. A style of small trailer that is hard sided, where the walls sort of telescope up to full height when you set up in camp. Collapsing back down approximately 50% for travel.

Power Operated Leveling Jacks | Electric or hydraulic jacks. Multiple jacks attached to the vehicle frame to level the rig automatically. Setting your rig level, front to rear and side to side. This is required for proper operation of most RV refrigerators as well as making it a lot easier to get to the bathroom in the dark. And the blood not running to your head at night.

Porpoising | A term used to define an up and down motion with a RV. A tad more common in truck and trailer combinations. Can still occur with motorhomes as well, with the rig rocking front to rear. Rather unsettling. Generally the result of an overloaded situation or improperly distributed weight. Can also be caused by improper hitch installation or weak springs / shocks. Sometimes on really bad pavement it doesn't matter if the rig is totally correct and proper as it will still porpoise. Nothing you can do but slow down until you get back to smoother pavement.

Primitive Camping | Also known as "dry camping", boondocking. Camping without the modern convenience of full-hookup facilities of city/well water, sewer/septic and electricity. Primitive campers rely on 'on-board' systems for these conveniences; generator, batteries, stored water, etc.

Propane | LPG, or liquefied petroleum gas, used in RVs for heating, cooking and refrigeration. Also called bottle gas, for manner in which it is sold and stored.

Pull, Tag, Bumper Pull Trailers | That variety of trailer where the hitch is connected to the bumper or receiver hitch on the tail end of a tow vehicle.

Puller | Slang for front engine motorhome. Term most often used to refer to front mounted diesel engine motorhomes.

Pull-through Site | A campsite that allows the driver to pull into the site to park, then pull out the other side when leaving, without ever having to back up.

Pusher | Slang for rear engine motorhome. Term most often used to refer to diesel engine motorhomes.

RV TERMS M - N

MH | Abbreviation for "motorhome".

Macerator Pump | Sort of a garbage disposal for the sewer / black water tank. It grinds the solids to 1/8" or less so it can be pumped through a hose as small as 3/4", up into a tank on your tow vehicle or toad. This allows you to get your tanks dumped when you are boondocking without having to move your whole rig. Nice thing when you are twenty \miles out in the bush. All you have to do is haul the tank to a dump station when you go into town for groceries or those little blue drop ins!

Marriage Saver | A meter used in adjusting your dish to maximize satelite reception. She can get a little cranky if she misses her show as he'd never complain if he can't watch the sports game!

Maximum Mass | The heaviest possible weight permitted for the RV is the maximum mass. See NCC

Minnie Winnie | A brand model of Winnebago.

Motorcoach | Term for motorhome on "bus-type" chassis.

Motorhome, Class "A" | Motorhomes built on a truck chassis.

Motorhome, Class "B" | Motorhomes that are very small and compact, which are simply van conversions. Packing self contained facilities into a van.

Motorhome, Class "C" | Motorhomes built on a van chassis and utilizing the cab of the van. Newer versions are using meduim duty truck chassis/cab setups.

NADA | Abbreviation for National Automotive Dealer's Association. Great place to get pricing for RVs.

Navy Shower | This is where you wet down, turn the water off, soap up, turn the water back on and rinse off, maybe repeat if really dirty. Since water conservation is one of the "big" things in RV Boondocking, this or some variety of it is an important technique.

NCC (Net Carrying Capacity) | The maximum combined weight of all passengers (if applicable), personal belongings, food, fresh water, supplies - derived by subtracting the uvw from the gvwr.

Nonpotable water | Water not suitable for human consumption.

SUBMIT RV TERMINOLOGY

We'd love to hear your RV terminology. If we use your definition, we'll send you a free camping knife. Submit RV term here . 

RV TERMS E - F

Engine Oil Cooler | A heat exchanger, similar to a small radiator, through which engine oil passes and is cooled by airflow.

Equalizing Hitch | A hitch that utilizes spring bars that are placed under tension to distribute a portion of the trailer's hitch weight to the tow vehicle's front axle and the trailer's axles. The hitch is also known as a weight-distributing hitch. Pretty much a required piece of equipment (in our opinion) for tag / bumper pull type trailers in excess of 5,000 pounds. This changes the "attitude" of the hitch, leveling the tow vehicle / trailer combination

Exhaust / Jake Brake | There are two types of brakes; exhaust and engine. An exhaust brake is a butterfly in the exhaust pipe that creates back pressure, holding back the vehicle. A true "jake" is an "engine brake". That is a system built into the valve train of an engine during manufacture. An exhaust brake can be added after market. An engine brake can only be a part of the original engine manufacture. Exhaust brakes are frequently called "Jake brakes" in a casual slang usage.

Fifth-Wheel Trailers | Fifth-wheel trailers are designed to be coupled to a special hitch that is mounted over the rear axle in the bed of a pickup truck. These trailers can have one, two or three axles and are the largest type of trailer built. Because of their special hitch requirements, fifth-wheel trailers can only be towed by trucks or specialized vehicles prepared for fifth-wheel trailer compatibility.

Final Drive Ratio | The reduction ratio found in the gearset that is located farthest from the engine. This is the same as the axle ratio.

Fiver | Other name for fifth wheel.

Fixed Bed | A built-in feature, a fixed bed does not need folding and storing during the day.

Fly Screen | A mesh screen that fits a window frame, a fly screen, covers a window and lets fresh air in while keeping flies and other insects outside.

FMCA | Abbreviation for Family Motor Coach Association.

Folding Tent Trailers | A style of small trailers, with canvas sides, often with a hard roof, that fold up/collapse into a very compact package for transport. Also known as Pop-up or Camping Trailers. Where the walls sort of telescope up to full height when you set up in camp. Collapsing back down approximately 50% for travel. Perfect RV for HOAs (Home Owner Associations).

Frame-Mount Hitch | Class II and higher hitches are designed to be bolted to the vehicle frame or cross members. This type of hitch may have a permanent ball mount, or may have a square-tube receiver into which a removable hitch bar or shank is installed.

Fresh Water | Water suitable for human consumption.

Full Hookup | Term for campground or shore accommodations offering water, sewer/septic and electricity; also refers to a RV with the abilities to use "full-hookups".

Full-Timing | Living in one's RV all year long. These RVers are known as full-timers or (in our opinion) the luckiest people on earth.

RV TERMS C - D

Cabcover | The part of a type C-motorhome that overlaps the top of the vehicle's cab, usually containing a sleeping, entertainment or storage unit.

Camber or Wheel Alignment | Camber is the number of degrees each wheel is off of vertical. Looking from the front, tops of wheels farther apart than bottoms means "positive camber". As the load pushes the front end down, or the springs get weak, camber would go from positive to none to negative (bottoms of wheels farther apart than tops).

Camper Shell | Removable unit to go over the bed of a pickup truck typically made out of aluminum or fiberglass.

Campervan | Small and economical, campervans are usually smaller than motorhomes, but they have room for a fold out bed as well as cooking facilities and offer low maintenance costs and increased accessibility for RVers who prefer more remote RV campsites.

Caravan | A group of RVers traveling together with their various RVs. Large caravans often space RVs five minutes or so apart with CB radios used for communication between the various RVers. The end vehicle is sometimes called the "tailgunner" and is the occupants watch out for a caravan member that may have had road trouble in order to assist however possible. Also what an RV is called in Europe.

Cassette Toilet | Toilet with a small holding tank that can be removed from outside the vehicle in order to empty it.

Caster or Wheel Alignment | The steering wheels' desire to return to center after you turn a corner. With too little positive caster, steering may be touchy at high speed and wheel return ability may be diminished when coming out of a turn. If one wheel has more positive caster than the other, that wheel will pull toward the center of the vehicle. This condition will cause the vehicle to pull or lead to the side with the least amount of positive caster.

Chassis Battery | Another name for the engine starting battery in motorhome for operating 12 volt components of drivetrain.

Class A Motorhome | An RV with the living accommodations built on or as an integral part of a self-propelled motor vehicle chassis. Models typically range from 24 to 40 feet long.

Class B Motorhome | Also known as a camping van conversion. These RVs are built within the dimensions of a van, but with a raised roof to provide additional headroom. Basic living accommodations inside are ideal for short vacations or weekend trips. Models typically range from 16 to 21 feet.

Class C Motorhome | An RV with the living accommodations built on a cutaway van chassis. A full-size bed, entertainment center or storage area is typical in the cabover section. Allows for ample seating, galley and bathroom facilities in the coach. Also called a "mini-motorhome" or "mini." Lengths typically range from approximately 16 to 32 feet.

Coach | Another name for a motorhome

Cockpit | The front of a motorized RV where the pilot (driver) and co-pilot (navigator) sit.

Condensation | Condensation is a result of warn moisture laden air contacting the cold window glass. Keeping a roof vent open helps to reduce the humidity levels. Roof vent covers help to prevent cold air, debris and weather from dropping down through the vent while still allowing moist air to escape. Using the roof vent fan when showering or the stove vent fan when cooking also helps prevent excess moisture buildup.

Converter | An electrical device for changing or converting 120-volt AC power into 12-volt DC power. Most RVs with electrical hookups will have a converter, since many of the lights and some other accessories run on 12-vold DC. Changing or converting to an inverter frequently yields better battery life due to the more proper charging capabilities of the improved chargers built into most inverters. Consider adding a surge protector between your unit and shore RV electric hook-ups to avoid power surges to your RV electrical system.

Corps of Engineers (COE) Camps | The Army Corp of engineers has sites all over the country. Generally they are areas where the Corp has built dams, reservoirs, etc.

Coupler | The part of a trailer A-frame that attaches to the hitch ball.

Crank Operated Jacks | Self explanatory. You have to hand crank these jacks, unless you have an adapter and a cordless drill. Can be scissor or vertical style. Used for leveling and the verticle style of hitch jacks on bumper pull trailers.

Crosswise | A piece of furniture arranged across the RV from side to side rather than front to rear.

Curb Weight | The weight of a basic RV unit without fresh or waste water in the holding tanks but with automotive fluids such as fuel, oil, and radiator coolant.

Curbside | The side of the RV that would be at the curb when parked.

Deep Cycle Battery | Batteries that are constructed to allow deeply discharging with minimal degradation of their capacity. Unlike "starting" batteries that are fairly quickly damaged by deep discharges. Word to wise, minimizing the depth of discharge of "Deep Cycle" batteries will lengthen their service life.

Detonation | Also known as "knock" or "ping," this is a condition in which some of the unburned air/fuel in the combustion chamber explodes at the wrong time in the ignition cycle, increasing mechanical and thermal stress on the engine.

Diesel Puller | Motorhome configuration where the diesel engine is in the front

Diesel Pusher | A motorhome with a rear diesel engine. Much, muchquieter!

Dinette | Booth-like dining area. Table usually drops to convert into a bed at night. Some are expandable.

Dinghy (not dingy) | A towed vehicle or "toad" behind a motorhome, sometimes with two wheels on a special trailer called a tow dolly, but often with all four wheels on the ground.

Dispersed Camping | Dry Camping or Boondocking on National Forest and BLM lands, in approved areas, where there is not a developed campground. Most National Forests and BLM (Bureau of land management) lands are open for "dispersed camping". Just find a nice spot in a "Legal" area, pull in, set up camp and start grillin'. Check on the two sitesNational Forest and Bureau of Land Management to check for dispersed camping in a particular area.

Dry Camping | Camping out in the boondocks or wilderness with no hookups. Even when it's raining, It's still "dry camping"! Using the self containment of your rig for the purpose it was designed! Ask us about solar and wind power green systems.

Dry Weight | Total rig weight unloaded. No fuel, water, groceries, propane, personal property, tools etc. .....completely empty of anything not from the factory!

DSI Ignition or Direct Spark Ignition | Refers to the method of igniting the main burner on a propane fired appliance. The burner is lit with an electric spark and the flame is monitored by an electronic circuit board. This ignition system is used in refrigerators, furnaces and water heaters. Some stove tops light the burners with a DSI ignition.

Dual Electrical System | RV equipped with lights / appliances which operate on 12-volt battery power when self-contained, and with a converter, on 110 AC current when in campgrounds or with an on board generator.

Dually | A pickup truck or light-duty tow vehicle, with four tires on one rear axle. Two per side.

Ducted AC | Air conditioning (A/C) supplied through a ducting system in the ceiling. Supplies cooling air at various vents located throughout the RV.

Ducted HEAT | Warm air from the furnace supplied to various locations in the RV through a ducting system located in the floor. (similar to home heating systems)

Dump Station | Where to get rid of the paper trail deposited in the Oval Office black tank. Facilities set up for RVers to dump their waste tanks. Usually a concrete pad with an inlet opening connected to an underground sewage system at a campground or other facility offering dumping service to RV travelers.

Dump Valves | The valves used to control the dumping of your holding tanks.

DW or Dry weight | The manufacturer's listing of the approximate weight of the RV with no supplies, water, fuel or passengers.

RV TERMS A - B

A Class or Class A Motorhome RV | This refers to recreational vehicles built on a motorized truck chassis, an A Class or Class A Motorhome is a large, long vehicle typically equipped with a cab, living quarters, kitchen and bathroom. Models typically range from 24 to 40 feet long.

Adjustable Ball Mount | An adjustable ball mount allows the ball to be raised,lowered and tilted in small increments to allow fine tuning of the spring bar setup and to compensate for tow vehicle "squat," which occurs after the trailer coupler is lowered onto the ball.

Affordable | Owning an RV makes economic sense. You are able to travel while spending significantly less. You have unlimited flexibility, even on a limited budget. Depending on the type of RV they own, a family of four can save up to 59% on vacation costs over other forms of travel, and a couple can save up to 47%. Thatu2019s after factoring in RV ownership costs, including payments, insurance, maintenance, tires, tax breaks, registration and depreciation.

Airbag | In RV terms, a sort of shock absorber positioned at the forward and rear axles of a motorhome.

Anode Rod | An anode rod, when used in a water heater, attracts corrosion causing products in the water. These products attack the anode rod instead of the metal tank itself. The anode rod should be inspected yearly and changed when it is reduced to about 1/4 of its original size. The rods are used in steel water heater tanks only. An aluminum tank has an inner layer of anode metal to accomplish the same thing. Anode rods should not be installed in an aluminum tank.

Arctic Pack | Also spelled Arctic Pac and Arctic Pak. Also called All Season and Four Season. An optional kit to insulate RVs for winter camping.

Auxiliary Battery | Extra battery to run 12-volt equipment.

Awnings | Extensions of canvas or faux canvas that provides shade to space beside the recreational vehicle so the RVer can set up chairs or a picnic table under shade. Some awnings have side enclosures called screen rooms. Awnings can be motorized or manually operated. Some even come equipped with wind sensors to automatically close if the wind gets too strong.

Axle Ratio | The final drive gear ratio created by the relationship between the ring and pinion gears and the rotation of the driveshaft. In a 4.10:1 axle ratio, for example, the driveshaft will rotate 4.1 times for each rotation of the axle shaft (wheel).


B-Class or Class B Motorhome RV | Also known as a camping van conversion. These RVs are built within the dimensions of a van, but with a raised roof to provide additional headroom. Basic living accommodations inside are ideal for short vacations or weekend trips. Models typically range from 16 to 21 feet.

Back-up Monitor | Video camera mounted on rear of motorhome to assist the driver visually with backing up the motorhome, via a monitor mounted in the driver's compartment or in a central area of the cab where it can be viewed by the driver from the driver's seat. These monitors are usually left in the "on" position to also assist the driver with the flow of traffic behind the motorhome and in watching a "towed" vehicle.

Ball Mount | The part of the hitch system that supports the hitch ball and connects it to the trailer coupler. Ball mounts are available in load-carrying and weight-distributing configurations.

Basement Model | An RV that incorporates large storage areas underneath a raised chassis.

Battery Bank | A collection of deep cycle batteries used to power your RV "House" systems. Generally 2 to 6 batteries connected in series and | or parallel.

Berth | A berth is a place in the motorhome with built-in beds for sleeping. Also referred to as a Bunkhouse.

Black Water | Black water is that smelly stuff that we don't talk about in polite company! You know what it is. That stuff you produce in the "oval office" with the paper trail.

Black Water Tank | Waste (sewage) from the toilet "oval office" is flushed into a black water holding tank, typically located beneath the main floor of the RV.

Blue Boy or Blueboy | Little bright blue, portable tanks with wheels, used to transport waste tank effluent to a usually nearby dump station when you are not hooked up.

Boondocking | Camping in an RV without benefit of electricity, fresh water, and sewer utilities.

Bowtie | Reference to Chevrolet because of the "bowtie" trademark.

Box | Reference to motorhome's "living area" on a Class A motorhome, built from the chassis up.

Brake Actuator | A device mounted under the dash of a towing vehicle to control the braking system of the trailer. Most Brake Actuators are based on a time delay, the more time the tow vehicle brakes are applied the "harder" the trailer brakes are applied.

Brake Controller | A control unit mounted inside the vehicle that allows electric trailer brakes to become activated in harmony with the braking of the tow vehicle. This device can be used to adjust trailer brake intensity, or to manually activate the trailer brakes.

Break Away System | This is a safety device switch, cable and small battery, somewhere on the hitch, which automatically powers the brakes of the trailer, if the hitch fails and the trailer comes loose. The idea is that the brakes come on and stop the "runaway" trailer. Hopefully, before anything else "goes wrong".

BTU or British Thermal Unit | A measurement of heat that is the quantity required to raise the temperature of one pound of water 1 degree F. RV air-conditioners and furnaces are BTU-rated.

Bubble | Loose term for defining a variety of conditions; such as when describing the level of RV sitting. (example: my RV is "off-level" a half bubble; referring to a "bubble-leveler" tool). Can also be used to describe a de-lamination condition, where a bubble occurs on the outside laminated skin of an RV.

Bump Steer | A term used to describe a condition where the front axle feels to be rapidly bottoming out on the jounce bumpers and transferred back through the steering column and steering wheel. There can be several different causes to the problem with different cures for each condition. Sometimes a simple fix such as shocks or a steering stabilizer; sometimes more detailed corrections needed for correcting serious manufacturing oversights.

Bumper-Mount Hitch | This type of hitch is available in two configurations: A bracket with a ball mounted to the bumper or a ball is attached to the bumper (typically on pickup trucks). These hitches have very limited RV applications.

Bumper-Pull | Slang term regarding the hitch or towing method for a conventional travel trailer or popup; receiver and ball-mount type hitch.

Bunkhouse | An RV area containing bunk beds instead of regular beds. Sometimes called a berth.

Bus Conversions | The big "Hollywood" type motorhomes built on large bus chassis. More lifestyles of the rich and famous than Boondocking R Us.

Butane | A hot and clean-burning fuel, some RV appliances run on butane fuel.

RV TERMS DICTIONARY GLOSSARY

Have you been wondering what in the world your fellow RVers are talking about? Little Dealer Little Prices RV Dictionary Glossary has compiled RVing Terms alphabetically and by topic.

RV TERMS G - H

Galley | The kitchen of an RV.

Gas Pusher | Slang for rear gasoline engine mounted chassis on motorhome.

Gaucho | Sofa/dinette bench that converts into a sleeping unit; a term less used now than formerly.

GAWR (Gross Axle Weight Rating) | The manufacturer's rating for the maximum allowable weight that an axle is designed to carry. Gawr applies to tow vehicle, trailer, fifth-wheel and motorhome axles.

GCWR (Gross Combination Weight Rating) | The maximum allowable weight of the combination of tow vehicle and trailer/ fifth-wheel, or motorhome and dinghy. It includes the weight of the vehicle, trailer/fifth-wheel (or dinghy), cargo, passengers and a full load of fluids (fresh water, propane, fuel, etc.).

Gear Vendor | Brand name for an auxiliary transmission designed to give the driver control of the vehicle's gear ratio and being able to split gears for peak performance and at the same time have an overdrive.

Generator | An electrical device powered by gasoline or diesel fuel, and sometimes propane, for generating 120-volt AC power in the absence of shore or solar power. Some RVers are even carrying wind generators that they set up for longer term, boondocking camps!

Genset | Abbreviation for generator set. A generator for powering 110 volt appliances in the absence of an inverter or for charging depleted batteries.

Golf Cart Battery | Common slang for a variety of deep cycle batteries. Generally a lead / acid type of battery.

Gooseneck | A colloquial name for fifth-wheel travel trailers.

Gray or Grey Water | Used water that drains from the kitchen and bathroom sinks and the shower into a holding tank, called a gray water holding tank, that is located under the main floor of the RV.

GTWR (Gross Trailer Weight Rating) | Maximum allowable weight of a trailer, fully loaded with cargo and fluids.

GVWR (Gross Vehicle Weight Rating) | The total allowable weight of a vehicle, including passengers, cargo, fluids and hitch weight.

Handover | In order to prepare the RVers (no matter what their level of previous experience) to safely and properly handle and maintain the recreational vehicle, a handover refers to the instructions given before the sold or hired RV is released and the keys are handed over to the person or persons renting or buying it.

Hard-sided | RV walls made of aluminum or other hard surface.

Heat Exchanger | A heat exchanger is a device that transfers heat from one source to another. For example, there is a heat exchanger in your furnace - the propane flame and combustion products are contained inside the heat exchanger that is sealed from the inside area. Inside air is blown over the surface of the exchanger, where it is warmed and the blown through the ducting system for room heating. The combustion gases are vented to the outside air.

Heat Strip | A heat strip is an electric heating element located in the air conditioning system with the warm air distributed by the air conditioner fan and ducting system. They are typically 1500 watt elements (about the same wattage as an electric hair dryer) and have limited function. Basically they "take the chill off"

High Profile | A fifth-wheel trailer with a higher-than-normal front to allow more than 6 feet of standing room inside the raised area.

Hitch | The fastening unit that joins a movable vehicle to the vehicle that pulls it.

Hitch Ratings | The weight rating or weight capacity of the hitch on your RV.

Hitch Weight | The actual amount of weight imposed on the hitch when the trailer / fifth-wheel is coupled. Sometimes referred to as conventional trailer "tongue weight." Hitch weight for a travel trailer can be 10-15 percent of overall weight; fifth-wheel hitch weight is usually 18 to 20 percent of the overall weight.

Holding Tanks | Fresh, Gray and Black Tanks that retain fresh and waste water when the RV unit is not connected to water or sewer. The gray water tank holds wastewater from the sinks and shower; the black water tank holds sewage from the toilet.

Hookups | The ability of connecting to a campground's facilities. The major types of hookups are electrical, water and sewer. If all three of these hookups are available, it is termed full hookup. Hookups may also include telephone and cable TV in some campgrounds.

House Battery | Battery or batteries in motorhome for operating the 12-volt system within the motorhome, separate from the chassis. Usually a bank of 2 to 6 batteries.

HP | Abbreviation for "horse power".

HR | Abbreviation for Holiday Rambler, a well-known RV manufacturer.

Hula Skirt | Term used for a type of dirt skirt accessory some RVers use on the back of their motorhome to aid in the protection from debris thrown from their rear wheels to the vehicles directly behind them or being towed behind them. This dirt skirt is usually the length of the rear bumper and resembles a short version of a Hawaiian "hula-skirt", reaching from bumper to road, hence the term.

RV TERMS I - J

Inverter | A unit that changes 12-volt direct current to 110-volt alternating current to allow operation of computers, TV sets, and the like when an RV is not hooked up to shore electricity.

Island Bed | A bed with walking space on both sides. Typically king or queen sized.

Jackknife | 90% angle obtained from turning / backing fifth wheel or travel trailer with tow vehicle. Jackknifing a short bed truck towing a fifth wheel without the use of a slider hitch or extended fifth wheel pin box can result in damage to the truck cab or breaking out the back window of the truck cab from the truck and fifth wheel "colliding".

Jacks or Leveling Jacks | Manual, electric or hydraulic jacks. Multiple jacks attached to the vehicle frame to level the rig either manually or automatically.

Journey | The journey is the action of transporting passengers from the starting point to the destination and is more fun in an RV.

RV TERMS K - L

KOA | Kampgrounds of America, a franchise chain of RV parks in North America that offers camping facilities to vacationers and overnighters.

Laminate | Sandwich of structural frame members, wall paneling, insulation and exterior covering, adhesive-bonded under pressure and/or heat to form the RV's walls, floor and/or roof.

Leveling - Ramps or Jacks | Positioning the RV in camp so it will be level, front to rear and side to side, using ramps (also called levelers) placed under the wheels, built-in scissors jacks, or power leveling jacks. This is required for proper operation of most RV refrigerators as well as making it a lot easier to get to the bathroom in the dark! Not to mention stopping the blood from pooling in your head in bed at night when your feet are a foot higher than your head!

Limited-Slip Differential | A differential that is designed with a mechanism that limits the speed and torque differences between its two outputs, ensuring that torque is distributed to both drive wheels, even when one is on a slippery surface.

Livability Packages | Items to equip a motorhome for daily living, rather than brought from home. Include items such as bed linens, pillows and blankets, bath towels, pots and pans, kitchen utensils, cutlery.

LP Gas | Propane; abbreviation for liquefied petroleum gas, which is a gas liquefied by compression, consisting of flammable hydrocarbons and obtained as a by-product from the refining of petroleum or natural gas. Also called bottled gas, LPG (liquid petroleum gas) and CPG (compressed petroleum gas).

RV CLASSIFICATIONS

Bus Conversions | The big "Hollywood" type motorhomes built on large bus chassis. More lifestyles of the rich and famous than Boondocking R Us.

Diesel Puller | A Class "A" Motorhome configuration where the diesel engine is in the front.

Diesel Pusher | A Class "A" Motorhome where the diesel engine is located in the rear of the vehicle. Much, much quieter!

Expandable Travel Trailer | A cross between a hard-sided travel trailer and a folding camping trailer, the expandable ends pull out to offer more sleeping room. Expandable units are lighter than the conventional travel trailer and often more affordable.*

Expandable Travel Trailer
Size | 19-30 ft
Costs | From $10,000 to $30,000
Sleeps | Up to 8
  • Smaller models can be towed by mid-size vehicles: either the family car, SUV or pickup truck. Check with your dealer for your vehicle's tow limits.
  • Lightweight versions have been designed specifically for towing behind many six-cylinder family vehicles. It is important to match the loaded weight of the RV to the towing capacity of the tow vehicle. Always check your vehicleu2019s owner's manual for towing weight restrictions and have your tow package professionally installed.
  • Easily detachable from the tow vehicle for separate use of the vehicle.
  • Large amount of living space makes kitchen, dining, bathroom and sleeping areas standard, with additional amenities available depending on size.


Fifth Wheel Travel Trailer | The fifth-wheel travel trailer can have the same amenities as the conventional travel trailer, but is constructed with a raised forward section that provides a spacious bi-level floor plan. These models are designed to be towed by a pickup truck equipped with a device known as a fifth-wheel hitch.*
Fifth-Wheel Travel Trailer
Size | 21-40 ft
Costs | From $18,000 to $160,000
Sleeps | Up to 6
  • Detachable from tow vehicle, allowing separate use of the vehicle.
  • All the conveniences of home, including sleeping, showering, dining, cooking, entertainment and storage. Many manufacturers also offer luxury models that are very spacious and elegantly furnished.
  • As many as four slideouts in some models, which move the RV wall outward up to three feet at the touch of a button to create larger living areas.
  • Often has a large picture window at the rear for panoramic views.
  • It is important to match the loaded weight of the RV to the towing capacity of the tow vehicle. Consult your dealer or owneru2019s manual for details and have the tow hitch professionally installed.
  • Lightweight models have been designed specifically to allow the use of smaller trucks with less towing capacity.
  • In several states, additional non-commercial driveru2019s licensing may be required for fifth-wheel travel trailers that exceed certain weight thresholds. Check with your local department of motor vehicles for specifics.


Folding Tent Camping Trailer | The folding camping trailer folds down for easy, lightweight towing. With canvas sides that extend to reveal queen-sized beds, you get a fresh-air experience with all the comforts of an RV. Some folding camping trailer models have slideouts that provide additional living space at the campground. Also known as pop-ups and tent trailers, folding camping trailers are great for outdoor lovers who want to sleep in a tent, but be off the ground.*
Folding Camping Trailer
Size | 8-24 ft
Costs | From $6,000 to $22,000
Sleeps | Up to 8
  • Folding camping trailers appeal to budget-conscious consumers looking for a roomy towable RV.
  • The lighter weight allows for towing behind many typical family vehicles, including some small cars. It is important to match the loaded weight of the RV to the towing capacity of the tow vehicle. Always check your vehicleu2019s owneru2019s manual for towing weight restrictions and have your tow package professionally installed.
  • Lightweight and easy to maneuver when closed, folding camping trailers are a snap to unhitch from the tow vehicle for separate use of the vehicle.
  • Compact size allows for easy storage as well as quick and simple setup.
  • Large amount of living space makes kitchen, dining and sleeping areas standard, with additional amenities available depending on size.


Horse Trailer | Horse Trailers with living quarters make traveling to equestrian events easy and economical.*
Horse Trailer
Size | Up to 51 ft
Costs | From $20,000 to $200,000
Sleeps | 2-4 people
Whether it's an afternoon horseback ride with one horse or a professional competition with more, there's an RV to fit your needs. Take along all the comforts of home, and save money by cooking your own meals and sleeping in your own bed instead of staying in a hotel. Each trailer offers modern conveniences such as kitchens, bathrooms and entertainment areas, as well as comfortable stalls for each horse. On-board dressing rooms make preparing for competition effortless.

Motorhome, Class A | Class A, Type A or conventional motorhomes are entirely constructed on a specially designed motor vehicle chassis. Home-like amenities abound in motorhomes, but generally they all have kitchens, bathrooms, entertainment centers and centrally controlled heating and air conditioning.*
Type A Motorhome
Size | 21-40 ft
Costs | $60,000-$500,000+
Sleeps | Up to 6
  • Spacious and well-equipped, even the smaller, basic models are well-appointed and roomy. Type A motorhomes include high-end luxury models with condo-like surroundings and all the bells and whistles of a custom home.
  • Type A motorhomes offer extensive storage capacity and often include basement storage areas.
  • Slideouts in some models move the RV wall outward up to three feet at the touch of a button to create larger living areas. Many models include multiple slideouts.
  • Any experienced driver can take the wheel. In several states, additional non-commercial driveru2019s licensing may be required for motorhomes that utilize air brakes or exceed certain weight thresholds. Check with your local department of motor vehicles for specifics.
  • A small vehicle can be towed behind, for short side trips once the motorhome is parked. Or you might prefer to tow a trailer to carry your boat or golf cart.


Motorhome, Class B | Commonly called van campers, Class or Type B motorhomes are built using automotive manufactured van or panel-truck shells. Van campers drive like the family car, but offer the comforts and conveniences of home.
Type B Motorhome
Size | 16-22 ft
Costs | From $60,000 to $130,000
Sleeps | Up to 4
  • Easy to drive and maneuver even in downtown settings.
  • Home-like conveniences are standard, including bathroom, sleeping, dining and kitchen facilities and storage.
  • Full stand-up room is achieved by the raised roof and sometimes by the use of dropped floors, for extra headroom inside.


Motorhome, Class C | Type C motorhomes are built on an automotive van frame with a wider body section attached to the original cab section. Amenities are similar to those in the conventional motorhomes. Most recognizable about the Type C motorhome is space over the cab that is often an optional sleeping area, entertainment center or extra storage.*
Type C Motorhome
Size | 21-35 ft
Costs | From $43,000 to $200,000+
Sleeps | Up to 8
  • Ample living space includes sleeping, kitchen, dining and bathroom facilities, as well as entertainment systems and storage.
  • Slideouts in some models, which move the RV wall outward up to three feet at the touch of a button to create larger living areas.


Specialty RVs for Disabled | Travel and outdoor enthusiasts with special needs are recapturing their mobility and having more fun on the road in recreation vehicles. RVs are the ideal way for everyone to experience the open road in convenience, comfort and style.*
Besides standard RV conveniences and amenities, accessible RV modifications can include:
  • Wheelchair lifts or ramps
  • Lower kitchen counters and cabinets
  • Widened entrances
  • Conveniently located controls
  • Roll-in showers
  • Roll-under sinks


Toy Hauler Travel Trailer, Fifth Wheel or Motorhome, Toy House, Sport Utility RV or SURV | The ultimate RV for Live Work Play.  For the active family that wants to take motorcycles, dirt bikes, ATVs or other toys on the road. Bring your hobbies or take your work. Available as a motorhome or towable unit, the rear end of the SURV drops down, forming a ramp for access into a u201cgarageu201d area where motorized toys can be safely stored, separated from the living quarters by a wall.*
Sport Utility RV (Towable and Motorized)
Size | 19-39 ft
Costs | From $10,300 to $170,000
Sleeps | Up to 8
  • All the conveniences of home, including kitchen, dining, bathroom, entertainment and storage.
  • Slideouts in some models, which move the RV wall outward up to three feet at the touch of a button to create larger living areas.


Travel Trailer, Bumper Pull or Conventional | Also referred to as "bumper pull" or "conventional trailers," these types of rigs have an A-frame and coupler and are attached to a ball mount on the tow vehicle. Travel trailers are available with one, two or three axles. Depending upon tow ratings, conventional trailers can be towed by trucks, cars or sport-utility vehicles. Conventional travel trailers offer a wide range of floor plans, sizes and conveniences.*
Conventional Travel Trailer
Size | 12-35 ft
Costs | From $8,000 to $95,000
Sleeps | Up to 10
  • Smaller models can be towed by mid-size vehicles, including the family car, SUV or pickup truck equipped with a hitch. It is important to match the loaded weight of the RV to the towing capacity of the tow vehicle. Consult your dealer or owneru2019s manual for details and have the tow hitch professionally installed.
  • Lightweight composite models are designed specifically for towing behind many six-cylinder family vehicles.
  • Easily detachable from tow vehicle, allowing separate use of the vehicle.
  • All the conveniences of home, including kitchen, dining, bathroom, entertainment and storage.
  • Slideouts in some models move the RV wall outward up to three feet at the touch of a button, to create larger living areas.


Truck Camper | The truck camper is a portable unit designed to be loaded onto, or affixed to, the bed or chassis of a pickup truck. The slide-in units are easily loaded and unloaded from the bed of the truck, and the truck is still free to tow boats, ATVs and other trailers.*
Truck Camper
Size | 8-20 ft
Costs | From $6,000 to $55,000
Sleeps | Up to 6
  • Easy, economical option, especially if you already own a pickup truck.
  • Compact size makes it easy for travel on rough or windy roads.
  • Detachable camping unit lets pickup truck be used separately.
  • Small space still offers a range of floor plans that maximize living area. Many models also have slideouts, which move the RV wall outward up to three feet at the touch of a button to create larger living areas.
  • Amenities include toilets, showers, kitchen facilities and storage.


There's an RV for everyone. A few easy questions will help us get to know you and find an RV that's just right.

Step 1: Relax. That's what RVing is all about.
What makes you, "you"? Are you a gourmet cook? Planning to bring the kids? Do you enjoy tailgating at concerts or games?
Step 2: So many options. Where to start?
Dream big...dream small. Find the RV that's just right. A few more questions by our RV professionals will narrow the RV options.
Step 3: Sometimes seeing is believing.
Like what you see? Visit us today to get you on your way to a lifelong RV adventure.


* Information Source Go RVing

RV HITCHES & RELATED

Ball Mount | The part of the hitch system that supports the hitch ball and connects it to the trailer coupler. Ball mounts are available in load-carrying and weight-distributing configurations.

Break Away System | This is a safety device switch, cable and small battery, somewhere on the hitch, which automatically powers the brakes of the trailer, if the hitch fails and the trailer comes loose. The idea is that the brakes come on and stop the "runaway" trailer. Hopefully, before anything else "goes wrong".

Bumper-Mount Hitch | This type of hitch is available in two configurations: A bracket with a ball mounted to the bumper or a ball is attached to the bumper (typically on pickup trucks). These hitches have very limited RV applications.Bumper-Pull | Slang term regarding the hitch or towing method for a conventional travel trailer or popup; receiver and ball-mount type hitch.Equalizing Hitch | A hitch that utilizes spring bars that are placed under tension to distribute a portion of the trailer's hitch weight to the tow vehicle's front axle and the trailer's axles. The hitch is also known as a weight-distributing hitch. Pretty much a required piece of equipment (in our opinion) for tag / bumper pull type trailers in excess of 5,000 pounds. This changes the "attitude" of the hitch, leveling the tow vehicle / trailer combination.

Fifth Wheel, 5th Wheel, Fiver, 5W Trailer or 5er Hitch | That type where the hitch is located in the bed of a pickup or medium duty truck, similar in configuration to semi-truck setups.

Hitch Ratings | The weight rating or weight capacity of the hitch on your RV.

Pull, Tag, Bumper Pull Trailers HitchThat variety of trailer where the hitch is connected to the bumper or receiver hitch on the tail end of a tow vehicle.

Slider Hitch | Referring to a sliding hitch used on short bed trucks for enabling them to tow fifth wheels, allowing them sufficient clearance to jack-knife the trailer. In this situation the trailer is too close to the cab. When making very tight turns you can get a conflict where the rear corner of the cab and the leading corner of the fifth wheel attempt to occupy the same space. The resulting collision is generally sure to make for a lousy day. The slide hitch, some automatic, some manual, slide temporarily to the rear, increasing the distance from trailer to cab and allowing tighter turns without "conflict". They must be returned to towing position before resuming high speed hauling and can only be used at relatively slow speeds.

Safety Chains or Cables | The chains on your hitch or tongue used to keep the trailer or towed vehicle connected to the tow vehicle in the event the hitch fails. You want proper rated chains to ensure the towed vehicle can not break totally free. We don't want a 10,000 pound trailer wandering around the interstate unsupervised at 65 mph!

Tow Bar or Tow Hitch | A hitch system used for connecting a dinghy vehicle or "Toad" to a motorhome or bus, when it's towed with all four wheels on the ground.

Weight Distributing Hitch | Also known as an "equalizing" hitch, this category includes hitch systems that utilize spring bars that can be placed under tension to distribute a portion of the trailer's hitch weight to the tow vehicle's front axle and the trailer's axles.

RV WATER SYSTEMS

Black Water | Black water is that smelly stuff that we don't talk about in polite company! You know what it is. That stuff you produce in the "oval office" with the paper trail.

Black Water Tank | Waste (sewage) from the toilet "oval office" is flushed into a black water holding tank, typically located beneath the main floor of the RV.

Blue Boy or Blueboy | Little bright blue, portable tanks with wheels, used to transport waste tank effluent to a usually nearby dump station when you are not hooked up.

Dump Station | Where to get rid of the paper trail deposited in the Oval Office black tank. Facilities set up for RVers to dump their waste tanks. Usually a concrete pad with an inlet opening connected to an underground sewage system at a campground or other facility offering dumping service to RV travelers.

Dump Valves | The valves used to control the dumping of your holding tanks.

Fresh Water | Water suitable for human consumption.

Full Hookup | Term for campground or shore accommodations offering water, sewer/septic and electricity; also refers to a RV with the abilities to use "full-hookups".

Gray or Grey Water | Used water that drains from the kitchen and bathroom sinks and the shower into a holding tank, called a gray water holding tank, that is located under the main floor of the RV.

Holding Tanks | Fresh, Gray and Black Tanks that retain fresh and waste water when the RV unit is not connected to water or sewer. The gray water tank holds waste water from the sinks and shower; the black water tank holds sewage from the toilet.

Hookups | The ability of connecting to a campground's facilities. The major types of hookups are electrical, water and sewer. If all three of these hookups are available, it is termed full hookup. Hookups may also include telephone and cable TV in some campgrounds.

Macerator Pump | Sort of a garbage disposal for the sewer / black water tank. It grinds the solids to 1/8" or less so it can be pumped through a hose as small as 3/4", up into a tank on your tow vehicle or toad. This allows you to get your tanks dumped when you are boondocking without having to move your whole rig. Nice thing when you are twenty \miles out in the bush. All you have to do is haul the tank to a dump station when you go into town for groceries or those little blue drop ins!

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Arizona State Trailer Sales, Inc. dba Little Dealer Little Prices RV (LDLP) is a full service RV Dealer with facilities in Mesa, Phoenix and Prescott Valley, Arizona. LDLP makes every effort to provide accurate and complete information, however errors still happen. LDLP provides NO assurance or warranty, expressed or implied, as to the accuracy, fitness for use, reliability or completeness of the data contained herein. It is up to the buyer to verify all information before purchasing. All unit prices listed may be subject to government fees and taxes, finance charges, added options,documentation fee, preparation charge, shipping or other added cost. Unauthorized attempts to upload or change information on this website are strictly prohibited and may be punishable under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act of 1986 and the National Information Infrastructure Protection Act. Information may also be used for authorized law enforcement investigations. This site uses a tool which collects your requests for pages and passes elements of them to search engines to assist them in indexing this site. We control the configuration of the tool and are responsible for any information sent to the search engines.    

LITTLE DEALER LITTLE PRICES LOCATIONS

Mesa                           Hours and Directions

SERVICE  480-655-9592            SALES   480-321-8365 

2038 N Country Club Dr, Mesa, AZ 85201


Phoenix                      Hours and Directions

SERVICE  623-889-3950            SALES   623-889-3995 

2350 W Deer Valley Rd, Phoenix, AZ 85027


Prescott Valley           Hours and Directions

SERVICE  928-350-2474            SALES  928-350-2400 

2757 N Truwood Dr, Prescott Valley, AZ 86314


RV Collision Center    Hours & Directions

623-889-3995 

2350 W Deer Valley Rd, Phoenix, AZ 85027

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